Date   

Re: IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

Andrew OBrien
 

It seems the answer is "WINLINK sessions are not decodable as they use B2F compression"

Andy 


Re: IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

Tony
 

Andy:

It's definitely a keyboard QSO -- pretty rare for Pactor-III.

Tony -K2MO


On 1/11/2019 5:39 PM, Andrew OBrien wrote:
Thanks Tony, that is encouraging.  I decoded the first P3 looking signal I saw and that is the one I posted the link to.  It looks like keyboarding to me.  I was not able to decode any apparent Winlink traffic though.  I will try again.  

Peter, the software is being described as "abandonware"  and is made freely available at http://www.kd0cq.com/2013/07/sorcerer-decoder-download/?fbclid=IwAR1vpWiog9wGvjtwy__9T8nXrnUJ2Or-u48ciwnqc8hbDs1BOSGWcDn3rdY

Andy K3UK



Re: IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

Andrew OBrien
 

Thanks Tony, that is encouraging.  I decoded the first P3 looking signal I saw and that is the one I posted the link to.  It looks like keyboarding to me.  I was not able to decode any apparent Winlink traffic though.  I will try again.  

Peter, the software is being described as "abandonware"  and is made freely available at http://www.kd0cq.com/2013/07/sorcerer-decoder-download/?fbclid=IwAR1vpWiog9wGvjtwy__9T8nXrnUJ2Or-u48ciwnqc8hbDs1BOSGWcDn3rdY

Andy K3UK


Re: IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

KC9SGV
 

Sorcerer, hey ?
😀
I see the twin peak P1 leader.
Then some hash looking to be 1500 hz wide.
The ARRL signal description says  P2 can fit into 500 hz wide.
So, by inference, that looks and sounds like P3. (Max 2400 hz wide)

KC9SGV


On Jan 11, 2019, at 9:34 AM, Andrew OBrien <k3ukandy@...> wrote:

Please see https://youtu.be/One9QvqtvZE  .  I used Sorcerer V1.1 software and selected the PIII modem and decoded the signals on 80M this morning.  Is it really PIII or has the PII modem simply decoded a keyboard QSO that was in P1 ?

Andy K3UK 


Oh no not again - This time MS Security Essentials and something else about Bitrep.B Trojan #VARA

Winter Bynes <winterbynes@...>
 

Hi folks,

I know this has happened before but, upon first booting and opening windows Defender (a subsection of MSSE) all is well and dandy, defender sits there doing its thing. Launch the VARA TNC and defender process gets killed. This is suspicious, is it not? It is to me! I didn't have an issue until today, maybe its heuristics but what I don't get is it making my system being unable to lauch windows defender after starting the TNC. Is there some code in there doing that on purpose for an innocent reason? I've put the C:\VARA dir as an exclusion, but this odd behaviour worries me. 

Thanks for looking into this, and if there is something I can provide to help please by all means ask away.

Best Regards
Red
PE1RRR


Re: IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

Tony
 

Andy:

Data is being received when the wide-band PSK carriers are being transmitted so it does appear to be Pactor-III. I believe Pactor-II uses 2 PSK carriers while Pactor-I uses 2 FSK tones. 

Tony -K2MO

On 1/11/2019 10:34 AM, Andrew OBrien wrote:
Please see https://youtu.be/One9QvqtvZE  .  I used Sorcerer V1.1 software and selected the PIII modem and decoded the signals on 80M this morning.  Is it really PIII or has the PII modem simply decoded a keyboard QSO that was in P1 ?

Andy K3UK 



IS this Pactor 3 I have decoded ? #Pactor

Andrew OBrien
 

Please see https://youtu.be/One9QvqtvZE  .  I used Sorcerer V1.1 software and selected the PIII modem and decoded the signals on 80M this morning.  Is it really PIII or has the PII modem simply decoded a keyboard QSO that was in P1 ?

Andy K3UK 


KU4XR Oper OP8 477 multiple TA spots , #opera

Graham
 

KU4XR Oper OP8  477 multiple  TA spots , last days 

Since  commencing  transmision  on  477 , using  Opera  Op8 ,  10/12/2018 , Andy, has  clocked up  a significant  number of  spots 
with  G0LUJ , located  NW coast  UK , with  17  spots last night , a mixture of full  data  decodes  and  correlation , 'deep  search' spots ,  all  time  matched  with  other  statio's  decodes/ spots , A single  spot ,  also  showing  by  PA0RDT , KB6WFC on the  west  coast , also received  multiple spots , 

73-Graham
g0nbd 



Additional  spots  have been  provided  by 

2019-01-09 05:40:55 KU4XR EM75XR  PA0RDT        JO11TM 6.834km 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-08 01:02:06 KU4XR EM75XR         KB8ECG  EN81CW 691 477 -11 Op8_||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||_~11dB
2019-01-08 00:20:22 KU4XR EM75XR         W3BRB EM93TE 439 477 -25 Op8_||||||||||||||_~25dB
2019-01-07 03:44:27 KU4XR EM75XR        N8TL EN81DB 594 477 -23 Op8_||||||||||||||||||_~23dB
2018-12-10 04:36:15 KU4XR EM75XR        VE7BDQ CN89LA 3.479 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2018-12-10 04:02:53 KU4XR EM75XR        G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2018-10-27 04:57:10 KU4XR EM75XR       W0YSE CN85RQ 3.391 477 -36 Op8__~36dB
2018-10-08 11:27:12 KU4XR EM75XR       KB6WFC CM87SQ 3.407 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
 

Andy is  running  20  watts  carrier  power to a  short  vertical  antenna  , with  extensive  top loading  and  ground  system  , the effective  power  dissipated  equates to  10  watts   due to  Opera  50% duty  cycle ,  not that the  power is  lost ,  , when the  TX is  OFF , its OFF , there  being  no  waste of power , simply  Opera  uses  manchester  coding to  provide  sync ,  and  single tone ASK , needing  no  additional  time locking .

Internet usage is  limited to  spot  distribution and  population of the   deep  search list , which is maintained via  local decode  and  the  web , 

the non-Ros  designed  correlation  systems  for  spotting  opera op8&op32 , provide  web -based  deep search call  lists , maintained by user's , 

Opera is  listed in ADIF ,  a non  deep search  spot is  a  true  data  decode 
2019-01-09 07:46:02 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-09 07:29:21 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-09 07:12:40 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-09 06:55:59 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -37 Op8__~37dB
2019-01-09 06:47:38 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 06:39:18 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -37 Op8__~37dB
2019-01-09 06:30:58 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -36 Op8__~36dB
2019-01-09 06:22:37 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 05:40:55 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-09 05:32:34 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -36 Op8__~36dB
2019-01-09 05:24:14 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -34 Op8__~34dB
2019-01-09 05:15:53 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 04:59:13 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -37 Op8__~37dB
2019-01-09 04:50:52 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 04:42:31 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 04:25:51 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -33 Op8__~33dB
2019-01-09 04:17:30 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-08 05:45:39 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-08 05:20:38 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-08 03:40:33 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-08 03:32:12 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-08 03:07:11 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-08 02:50:30 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -37 Op8__~37dB
2019-01-08 02:33:49 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-06 07:45:55 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-06 07:37:35 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-06 06:39:12 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-06 04:17:24 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-06 03:27:21 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -37 Op8__~37dB
2019-01-06 03:10:40 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2019-01-06 03:02:19 KU4XR AA          G0LUJ  IO83LS 0      477 -31 Op8_||_~31dB
2019-01-03 03:55:55 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2019-01-03 03:47:35 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2018-12-26 04:01:19 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2018-12-10 05:17:57 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB
2018-12-10 05:01:16 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -38 Op8__~38dB
2018-12-10 04:02:53 KU4XR EM75XR G0LUJ IO83LS 6.326 477 -39 Op8__~39dB

Posted to  the  Opera Yahoo  user  group ,  by  Andy 

Hi all, and HNY:

I would rate last nights results as the best to date using OP -8 on 477 KHz. First time reception from Roelof - PA0RDT
17 receptions from Geof - G0LUJ with 7 full decodes. and 6 receptions from Mike - KB6WFC with 1 full decode.

73 and Best DX to all: 
Andy - KU4XR

05:40 477 KU4XR de PA0RDT Op8 Deep Search 4244 mi -39 dB in Middelburg, Netherlands 1491,0 Hz 

07:46 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -39 dB in Lytham, England 1489.7 Hz
07:29 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -39 dB in Lytham, England 1489.3 Hz
07:12 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -39 dB in Lytham, England 1488.5 Hz 
06:56 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -37 dB in Lytham, England 1488.5 Hz 
06:47 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:3% in Lytham, England 1488.8 Hz 
06:39 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -37 dB in Lytham, England 1488.5 Hz 
06:31 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -36 dB in Lytham, England 1488.5 Hz 
06:22 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:2% in Lytham, England 1488.3 Hz 
05:40 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -38 dB in Lytham, England 1489.7 Hz 
05:32 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -36 dB in Lytham, England 1489.5 Hz 
05:24 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -34 dB F:2% in Lytham, England 1489.3 Hz 
05:15 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:0% in Lytham, England 1489.7 Hz 
04:59 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -37 dB in Lytham, England 1489.7 Hz 
04:50 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:2% in Lytham, England 1489.5 Hz 
04:42 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:2% in Lytham, England 1489.5 Hz 
04:25 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 3929 mi -33 dB F:2% in Lytham, England 1490.5 Hz
04:17 477 KU4XR de G0LUJ Op8 Deep Search 3929 mi -38 dB in Lytham, England 1491.0 Hz

08:44 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 Deep Search 2116 mi -39 dB in Daly City, CA, USA 1486.8 Hz 
08:36 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 Deep Search 2116 mi -37 dB in Daly City, CA, USA 1486.6 Hz 
08:02 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 Deep Search 2116 mi -38 dB in Daly City, CA, USA 1486.8 Hz 
07:54 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 Deep Search 2116 mi -37 dB in Daly City, CA, USA 1488.0 Hz 
07:29 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 2116 mi -32 dB F:4% in Daly City, CA, USA 1487.8 Hz
07:21 477 KU4XR de KB6WFC Op8 Deep Search 2116 mi -38 dB in Daly City, CA, USA 1487.5 Hz


Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Tony
 

Ev Tupis wrote:

On 10 meters, meteor ionization lasts for a very long time

The occasional long-duration ping would certainly make PSK31 useful Ev. In theory, the duration of the reflection is proportional to the square of the wavelength so the upper HF bands do have an advantage over VHF.   

In the early days, I experimented with Fast Hellschreiber which I thought might have an advantage over high-speed CW. Unfortunately, it lacked sensitivity so it took a fair amount of power to print well. The attached image shows a strong but short-lived reflection taken during a 10 meter test session.

Of course aircraft scatter would present itself much like MS so one would have to consider how to ID and remove that from the data set.

 
Yes it's difficult to distinguish MS from AC scatter without recording the duration of the reflections. You could eliminate all reports within aircraft scatter range (500 miles) and take all others as meteor scatter out to 1300 miles.

I often do this while monitoring my own reports when working meteor scatter on 6 and 2 meters. I've attached a few screen shots that show several reports well beyond aircraft scatter range. 

Tony -K2MO


 

and were corroborated by similar success using AX.25 over the same pathway.  In the early days, our Probes included both modes, making this much easier.

On 10 meters, meteor ionization lasts for a very long time (on the order of 30 seconds to several minutes).  Our system tracked the stream, so doppler wasn't an issue.

I haven't given alot of thought about mining the PropNET database for such occurrences, however doing so should be possible...especially in low sunspot times where Es isn't "noise". Lol.

Of course aircraft scatter would present itself much like MS so one would have to consider how to ID and remove that from the data set.

Cheers,
Ev


On Thursday, January 3, 2019, 4:19:43 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


Ev:

With PSK31 printing less than 3 characters per second, I would assume the productive periods you're referring to coincide with major showers where meteor trail reflections are long enough in duration to capture call signs?

I take it that there's little data being captured during non-shower periods (daily sporadic activity) where vast majority of the reflections are short-lived?

Is there a way to search the PropNet archives to see the data you're referring to?

Tony -K2MO



On 12/21/2018 3:36 AM, Ev Tupis via Groups.Io wrote:
In the early days of PropNET (http://www.PropNET.org) we used AX.25 on 10 and 6 meters.  We found 10 meters to be very productive for meteor work as a result.  We have since moved to PSK31 where we have documented MS propagation on that mode, too.

Interestingly, the "sweet spot" for commercial meteor scatter operations is in the 40 MHz range right between those two bands.

Ev, W2EV

PS: The PropNET Project will be end on or about December 31 after 20 years of operation.



On Thursday, December 20, 2018, 5:07:04 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


All:

The idea of using meteor scatter to communicate on a dead 10 meter band
caught my attention many years ago. I've done extensive testing since
then and found that meteor scatter is relatively easy to accomplish on
this band.

I've worked 6 meter meteor scatter for many years and the impression one
gets is that QSO success rates are likely to be higher on 10 compared to
6 meters and especially 2 meters.

That observation coincides with general radio meteor theory that says
longer wavelengths provide longer more intense meteor trail reflections
-- something I've seen repeatedly during testing which is shown in the
attached spectrogram.

To illustrate what a 10 meter meteor scatter QSO is like, I recorded a
short video of one of the QSO's I had with VE2FXL. We used one of the
WSJT JT9 fast-modes designed to decode short-lived meteor scatter
reflections.


So 10 meters may be a good alternative for those who do not have 6 meter
capability and would like to try meteor scatter. It's also a way to make
use of 10 meters during the lull in the sunspot cycle or at night when
the band becomes dormant.

Tony -K2MO







Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Ev Tupis <w2ev@...>
 

Hi Tony,

The Meteor Scatter based PSK31 successes took place during meteor showers and were corroborated by similar success using AX.25 over the same pathway.  In the early days, our Probes included both modes, making this much easier.

On 10 meters, meteor ionization lasts for a very long time (on the order of 30 seconds to several minutes).  Our system tracked the stream, so doppler wasn't an issue.

I haven't given alot of thought about mining the PropNET database for such occurrences, however doing so should be possible...especially in low sunspot times where Es isn't "noise". Lol.

Of course aircraft scatter would present itself much like MS so one would have to consider how to ID and remove that from the data set.

Cheers,
Ev


On Thursday, January 3, 2019, 4:19:43 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


Ev:

With PSK31 printing less than 3 characters per second, I would assume the productive periods you're referring to coincide with major showers where meteor trail reflections are long enough in duration to capture call signs?

I take it that there's little data being captured during non-shower periods (daily sporadic activity) where vast majority of the reflections are short-lived?

Is there a way to search the PropNet archives to see the data you're referring to?

Tony -K2MO



On 12/21/2018 3:36 AM, Ev Tupis via Groups.Io wrote:
In the early days of PropNET (http://www.PropNET.org) we used AX.25 on 10 and 6 meters.  We found 10 meters to be very productive for meteor work as a result.  We have since moved to PSK31 where we have documented MS propagation on that mode, too.

Interestingly, the "sweet spot" for commercial meteor scatter operations is in the 40 MHz range right between those two bands.

Ev, W2EV

PS: The PropNET Project will be end on or about December 31 after 20 years of operation.



On Thursday, December 20, 2018, 5:07:04 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


All:

The idea of using meteor scatter to communicate on a dead 10 meter band
caught my attention many years ago. I've done extensive testing since
then and found that meteor scatter is relatively easy to accomplish on
this band.

I've worked 6 meter meteor scatter for many years and the impression one
gets is that QSO success rates are likely to be higher on 10 compared to
6 meters and especially 2 meters.

That observation coincides with general radio meteor theory that says
longer wavelengths provide longer more intense meteor trail reflections
-- something I've seen repeatedly during testing which is shown in the
attached spectrogram.

To illustrate what a 10 meter meteor scatter QSO is like, I recorded a
short video of one of the QSO's I had with VE2FXL. We used one of the
WSJT JT9 fast-modes designed to decode short-lived meteor scatter
reflections.


So 10 meters may be a good alternative for those who do not have 6 meter
capability and would like to try meteor scatter. It's also a way to make
use of 10 meters during the lull in the sunspot cycle or at night when
the band becomes dormant.

Tony -K2MO






Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Tony
 

Ev:

With PSK31 printing less than 3 characters per second, I would assume the productive periods you're referring to coincide with major showers where meteor trail reflections are long enough in duration to capture call signs?

I take it that there's little data being captured during non-shower periods (daily sporadic activity) where vast majority of the reflections are short-lived?

Is there a way to search the PropNet archives to see the data you're referring to?

Tony -K2MO



On 12/21/2018 3:36 AM, Ev Tupis via Groups.Io wrote:
In the early days of PropNET (http://www.PropNET.org) we used AX.25 on 10 and 6 meters.  We found 10 meters to be very productive for meteor work as a result.  We have since moved to PSK31 where we have documented MS propagation on that mode, too.

Interestingly, the "sweet spot" for commercial meteor scatter operations is in the 40 MHz range right between those two bands.

Ev, W2EV

PS: The PropNET Project will be end on or about December 31 after 20 years of operation.



On Thursday, December 20, 2018, 5:07:04 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


All:

The idea of using meteor scatter to communicate on a dead 10 meter band
caught my attention many years ago. I've done extensive testing since
then and found that meteor scatter is relatively easy to accomplish on
this band.

I've worked 6 meter meteor scatter for many years and the impression one
gets is that QSO success rates are likely to be higher on 10 compared to
6 meters and especially 2 meters.

That observation coincides with general radio meteor theory that says
longer wavelengths provide longer more intense meteor trail reflections
-- something I've seen repeatedly during testing which is shown in the
attached spectrogram.

To illustrate what a 10 meter meteor scatter QSO is like, I recorded a
short video of one of the QSO's I had with VE2FXL. We used one of the
WSJT JT9 fast-modes designed to decode short-lived meteor scatter
reflections.


So 10 meters may be a good alternative for those who do not have 6 meter
capability and would like to try meteor scatter. It's also a way to make
use of 10 meters during the lull in the sunspot cycle or at night when
the band becomes dormant.

Tony -K2MO






Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Tony
 

Amos:

See reply below. Hope this helps.

Tony -K2MO

____________________________________________________

Hi Tony,

The main site used for VHF / UHF sheds in EU is ON4KST http://www.on4kst.com/index.php

This site also has Region 2 and Region 3 pages for stations in those Regions to make QSOs with stations local to them, but many US, Caribbean and near east stations log into the 50MHz Region 1 chat in the SpE season.

The web interface for ON4KST takes a bit of getting used to, but is superb in what it can show. However, if chatting is your main use, then KST2Me by OZ2M is a much better way to use the ON4KST chat: http://www.rudius.net/oz2m/software/kst2me/ < KST2Me is free, but you need to request a key from OZ2M. Also KST2Me uses Telnet to connect to the ON4KST server, this is bandwidth light and even works well on slow 2G/GPRS connections, KST2Me is my main way of using the ON4KST chat. I then use the likes of DXMaps to show the current band activity, and PSKReporter for viewing, on a map, won I'll RX'ing, and where I'm being heard.

BR,

Gavin Nesbitt, M1BXF.
http://www.geekshed.co.uk


Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Tony
 

Amos:

> You are showing JT9-G mode. I am using WSJT-X v2.0.0 but can't find it. How?

Go to Files / Settings / General and select Enable VHF/UHF Microwave Features. Check the FAST box on the main window to enable the JT-9 fast modes then check sub-mode G. Change the TX/RX stetting from 60 seconds to 15 seconds.

> How do I get meteor scatter QSO? Do I have to arrange a meeting with somebody?

Most meteor scatter QSO's are made online using live sked pages like Ping Jockey https://www.pingjockey.net/cgi-bin/pingtalk while some are made at random. This video shows that you can make random contacts without skeds by monitoring the calling frequencies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_DZZj1HUJIY

I'm not sure which sked page is used in your region Amos -- I'll poke around and see what I can find. Keep in mind that the majority of meteor scatter activity is located in the U.S. and Europe on 6 and 2 meters using MSK144. Maximum range is 1,300 miles.

You can check which stations are in range of your QTH with PSK Reporter. Do a search for 6 meters and the MSK144 mode. https://www.pskreporter.info/pskmap.html

Tony -K2MO

 





On 12/21/2018 10:44 AM, asobel@... wrote:
Tony
1. You are showing JT9-G mode. I am using WSJT-X v2.0.0 but can't find it. How?
2. How do I get meteor scatter QSO? Do I have to arrange a meeting with somebody?

Amos 4X4MF



Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

asobel@...
 

Tony
1. You are showing JT9-G mode. I am using WSJT-X v2.0.0 but can't find it. How?
2. How do I get meteor scatter QSO? Do I have to arrange a meeting with somebody?

Amos 4X4MF


Re: Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Ev Tupis <w2ev@...>
 

In the early days of PropNET (http://www.PropNET.org) we used AX.25 on 10 and 6 meters.  We found 10 meters to be very productive for meteor work as a result.  We have since moved to PSK31 where we have documented MS propagation on that mode, too.

Interestingly, the "sweet spot" for commercial meteor scatter operations is in the 40 MHz range right between those two bands.

Ev, W2EV

PS: The PropNET Project will be end on or about December 31 after 20 years of operation.



On Thursday, December 20, 2018, 5:07:04 PM EST, Tony <DXDX@...> wrote:


All:

The idea of using meteor scatter to communicate on a dead 10 meter band
caught my attention many years ago. I've done extensive testing since
then and found that meteor scatter is relatively easy to accomplish on
this band.

I've worked 6 meter meteor scatter for many years and the impression one
gets is that QSO success rates are likely to be higher on 10 compared to
6 meters and especially 2 meters.

That observation coincides with general radio meteor theory that says
longer wavelengths provide longer more intense meteor trail reflections
-- something I've seen repeatedly during testing which is shown in the
attached spectrogram.

To illustrate what a 10 meter meteor scatter QSO is like, I recorded a
short video of one of the QSO's I had with VE2FXL. We used one of the
WSJT JT9 fast-modes designed to decode short-lived meteor scatter
reflections.


So 10 meters may be a good alternative for those who do not have 6 meter
capability and would like to try meteor scatter. It's also a way to make
use of 10 meters during the lull in the sunspot cycle or at night when
the band becomes dormant.

Tony -K2MO





Ten Meter Meteor Scatter Video #10M Meteor Scatter Video JT9-Fast Modes #10m

Tony
 

All:

The idea of using meteor scatter to communicate on a dead 10 meter band caught my attention many years ago. I've done extensive testing since then and found that meteor scatter is relatively easy to accomplish on this band.

I've worked 6 meter meteor scatter for many years and the impression one gets is that QSO success rates are likely to be higher on 10 compared to 6 meters and especially 2 meters.

That observation coincides with general radio meteor theory that says longer wavelengths provide longer more intense meteor trail reflections -- something I've seen repeatedly during testing which is shown in the attached spectrogram.

To illustrate what a 10 meter meteor scatter QSO is like, I recorded a short video of one of the QSO's I had with VE2FXL. We used one of the WSJT JT9 fast-modes designed to decode short-lived meteor scatter reflections.

See: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-C8XMhgkF4

So 10 meters may be a good alternative for those who do not have 6 meter capability and would like to try meteor scatter. It's also a way to make use of 10 meters during the lull in the sunspot cycle or at night when the band becomes dormant.

Tony -K2MO


Re: Wolfphi Link Interface For Windows Tablet #wolphilink

Tony
 

All:

I can confirm that the Wolfphi Link interface works with Windows Surface tablets. It's a compact interface that doesn't require any power so it's handy for portable work. It's designed for Android Smartphones, but it looks like it may work with other devices.

See: http://www.wolphi.com/interface/

Tony -K2MO


Re: Could VARA HF SSB work via the new Es'Hail 2 Geostationary Ham Satellite ? #VARA #WinLink

KC9SGV
 

Available America's Geostationary satellites to receive with a RTL SDR and old LNB.
http://frequencyplansatellites.altervista.org/Beacon-Telemetry_Americas.html

How to receive....
https://www.rtl-sdr.com/receiving-satellite-tv-beacons-rtl-sdr-lnb/

KC9SGV


Re: Current Calling Frequencies (for finding each other when signals are weak) #Olivia

Tom DF5JL
 

Hello, Tomas,

so far I did not understand, why these crooked frequencies should make sense.

If, for example, I know that the frequency 14.107,5 kHz is a popular meeting point (center frequency), then there is the possibility of avoiding it (at 1000 Hz signal width) at 14.106,5 or 14.108,5 kHz.

So why not use the frequencies 18.103 kHz (center) on 17m instead of 18.1029? Why so crooked and complicated when it can be (much) easier?

73 Tom DF5JL / IARU Region1 HF Manager



Am 18.10.2018 um 10:05 schrieb Tomas, NW7US:

 
The listing shows CENTER, then DIAL, then the number of tones and the bandwidth.
 
CENTER - DIAL (Tones/Bandwidth)
1.8269 - 1.8254 (8/250)
3.5729 - 3.5714 (8/250)
7.0729 - 7.0714 (8/250)
10.1429 - 10.1414 (8/250)
14.0729 - 14.0714 (8/250)
14.1075 - 14.106 (16/1000)
18.1029 - 18.1014 (8/250)
21.0729 - 21.0714 (8/250)
24.9229 - 24.9214 (8/250)
28.1229 - 28.1214 (8/250)
and so on.
 


Re: 10 Meters open 24 Hours and counting #propnet

Andrew O'Brien
 

I missed it!


On Mon, Dec 3, 2018 at 6:26 AM Ev Tupis via Groups.Io <w2ev=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Shhhh. The band has been open for over 24 hours, straight (as I write this at 6:30 AM ET, USA).  Don't tell anyone that this is sunspot minimum!




"10" pins are PropNET Probes (auto-IDing PSK31 stations running the ACDS^31 software)
"N" pins are "N"ot PropNET stations that were skimmed from the waterfall.
"L" pins are PropNET "L"urkers (PSK31 stations running ACDS^31 software in RX-only)

Ev, W2EV

PS: The PropNET Project uses APRS protocols on PSK31 (hence, including our APRS cousins in this e-mail).



--
Andy

761 - 780 of 51567